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Portraits 2017

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Portraits 2017

The Portraits 2017 series analyzes survey data from a comprehensive study of public opinion in Ontario and Quebec. The survey focused on a wide range of subjects, including federalism, the economy, social programs, international trade, immigration and diversity, and relations with Indigenous peoples. The data provides valuable new evidence about whether and how citizens’ attitudes towards one another, to the federation and to Canada are evolving at a time of considerable change and uncertainty in the wider global political context.

The Portraits 2017 survey was conducted with support from Alain-G. Gagnon, holder of the Canada Research Chair in Quebec and Canadian Studies and director at the Centre d’analyse politique: Constitution et Fédéralisme, based at UQAM.

Reports

Portraits 2017: International Trade & Globalization

March 28, 2018 | Mowat Centre Most Ontarians support international trade agreements and a majority of Ontarians support more rapid globalization. These are among the main findings in the latest report from Mowat’s Portraits 2017 survey series. Read More

Portraits 2017: Immigration & Diversity

March 6, 2018 | Mowat Centre Most Ontarians remain comfortable with current levels of immigration and with the province’s growing diversity, and there is increasing support for welcoming those fleeing conflicts. Read More

Portraits 2017

December 20, 2017 | Mowat Centre

A Fresh Look at Public Opinion and Federalism

This sesquicentennial year has provided Canadians with an opportunity to celebrate their country’s achievements, to consider how it has changed and to reflect on how it needs to adapt to current and pending challenges. Read More

Balance of Risks

December 11, 2017 | Mowat Centre

Vertical Fiscal Imbalance and Fiscal Risk in Canada

Provincial governments have responsibility for delivering most of Canada’s important social programs, whereas the federal government has the discretion to pick and choose how much it wants to spend to support them at any given time. This results in a fundamental imbalance in the amount of “fiscal risk” federal and provincial governments are exposed to. Read More

 

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